Stitched Fruit Slice Keychain

By Melissa Galbraith  

DIY Embroidery Art 

Hi, I’m Melissa, the fiber artist behind MCreativeJ

I’m the April featured artist for Jenny Lemons, and I want to show you a fun and easy way to make your own embroidered keychain. 

Gather Your Materials

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SHOP MCREATIVEJ

Online Workshop 5/9: Floral Embroidery 

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Online Workshop 5/25: Draw With Thread

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Online Workshop 6/24: Desert Landscape Pin

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Step 1: Cut Your Felt

Cut a 5x5 inch square of craft felt and place it inside the embroidery hoop

Step 2: Place your transfer

Gently peel away the water-soluble transfer paper backing. Place the design, sticky side down, onto the felt.

Step 3: Stitch your fruit slice

Starting with the outline color, thread the embroidery needle and knot the end. Use the back stitch to fill in the rind of the fruit slice. 

Next, thread the embroidery needle with the inner fruit color. You can outline each fruit section using the back stitch or fill in the pattern using the long and short satin stitch.

Step 4: Cut out your design

When you are done stitching, remove the felt from the embroidery hoop. Trim the felt  ¼ inch away from the stitching.   

To remove the water-soluble transfer design, run the felt under warm water. The transfer paper should dissolve. Let the embroidered felt air dry or dry with a blow-dryer (this is much faster if you don’t like waiting, like me).

Step 5: Assemble the pieces!

Sandwich the sewn end of the rectangle between the two half circles of felt. Using the threaded embroidery needle, sew the back stitch, around the outer edge of the three pieces so they are all sewn together.  

Finally, attach the keychain ring to the loop and enjoy! 

I hope you enjoy this project! 

On April 25, I’ll teach a Zoom Class how to make an embroidered fruit keychain

I would love to see you there!


MELISSA GALBRAITH

was born and raised in the desert of Washington state, where her mother instilled a love of making things by hand. She draws inspiration from the desert and plants to create whimsical and modern fiber art. 

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